A Travellerspoint blog

Legacy of the Incas

Lima

semi-overcast 80 °F

My current adventure is with Globus Journeys participating in a Legacy of the Incas tour in Peru with a visit to Machu Picchu. This a special trip for me because my brother and his wife and cousin and his wife are with the group along with one my my best clients from Texas. Our group is only 21 folks, which is a perfect size for a tour group.

As is usual, we flew down to Lima a day early to make sure we got to Lima and to allow for a quiet day, even though we are in Eastern Standard Time and had no zone shift.

Lima is the capital and the largest city of Peru. It is located in the valleys of the Chillón, Rímac and Lurín rivers, in the central coastal part of the country, overlooking the Pacific Ocean. Together with the seaport of Callao, it forms a contiguous urban area known as the Lima Metropolitan Area. With a population of almost 10 million, Lima is the most populous metropolitan area of Peru, and the third largest city in the Americas (as defined by "city proper"), just behind São Paulo and Mexico City. Lima was founded by Spanish conquistador Francisco Pizarro on January 18, 1535, as Ciudad de los Reyes. It became the capital and most important city in the Spanish Viceroyalty of Peru. Following the Peruvian War of Independence, it became the capital of the Republic of Peru. Today, around one-third of the Peruvian population lives in the metropolitan area.

As it was Sunday, I was able to attend a catholic mass a few blocks away in a beautiful church. Peru is 90% Catholic and this church celebrated 6 masses during the course of the day. After mass we walked down to Larcomar - a lovely park on the cliffs overlooking the water and had some lunch in a nice sea side cafe.

We formally start the tour this afternoon with a city tour and dinner.

large_DSC_5846a.jpglarge_DSC_5844a.jpglarge_DSC_5842a.jpglarge_DSC_5841a.jpglarge_DSC_5840a.jpg

Posted by rpickett 09:14 Archived in Peru Tagged lima

Table of contents

Be the first to comment on this entry.

Comments on this blog entry are now closed to non-Travellerspoint members. You can still leave a comment if you are a member of Travellerspoint.

Enter your Travellerspoint login details below

( What's this? )

If you aren't a member of Travellerspoint yet, you can join for free.

Join Travellerspoint