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Legacy of the Incas

Lima

overcast 80 °F

Our tour actually started today, and our Tour Guide Mauricio lead us on a complete city tour. Our first stop was a local Peruvian market where we could see some of the local fruits and veggies.
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We then drove back into town, and started our walking tour to the 17th Century San Francisco Monastery, and the government palace.
The San Francisco Monastery was consecrated in 1673 and completed in 1774. Though it survived several earthquakes intact in 1687 and 1746, it suffered extensive damage in an earthquake in 1970. The church is noted for its architecture, a high example of Spanish Baroque. Its granite carved portal would later influence those on other churches, including the Church of Merced. The vaults of the central and two side naves are painted in mudejar style: a mix of Moorish and Spanish designs. The head altar is fully carved out of wood. The corridors of the main cloister are inlaid with Sevillian glazed tiles dating from the 1620s. The complex is made of the temple, the convent and two other churches, 'La Soledad' and 'El Milagro'. No photos are permitted inside the Monastery.
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Our dinner this evening was at the private home Casa Garcia Alvarado. At the beginning of the twentieth century, Lima’s upper class began to move their homes away from downtown Lima to Miraflores which was one of the first residential districts to be established at that time. The architecture of these homes was typical of resort homes of that period. They were made of “quincha” (adobe), decorated with wood on the façade, and contained large courtyards inside. On Avenida Larco in front of Miraflores Central Park, located a few metres from the Municipality, is the old but impressive house of the Castro Iglesias-Thorndike family which was constructed in 1912 by the Architect Rozzaga. The Castro Iglesias family goes way back to Peru's Colonial period, when its forerunners earned the titles, Count of Lurigancho and Marques of Otero, for services rendered to the Spanish Crown. Mrs. Thorndike was the daughter of a very distinguished Chilean lady and an American engineer who came to Peru with Henry Meiggs to construct railway bridges in the heights of the Andean mountains.
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Posted by rpickett 13:11 Archived in Peru Tagged lima

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Comments

Looks like a wonderful trip! I really enjoy reading your travel posts Rusty!

Thanks,
Dave

by Dave Loomis

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