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Copenhagen

Day 2

overcast 40 °F

Today dawned cloudy and about 40 degrees, which was fine because it is Museum day.

I boarded the 10:15 Hop-on, Hop-off and got off at stop 9 - The Rosenborg Castle.

The castle was originally built as a country summerhouse in 1606 and is an example of Christian IV's many architectural projects. It was built in the Dutch Renaissance style, typical of Danish buildings during this period, and has been expanded several times, finally evolving into its present condition by the year 1624. Architects Bertel Lange and Hans van Steenwinckel the Younger are associated with the structural planning of the castle. The castle was used by Danish regents as a royal residence until around 1710. After the reign of Frederik IV, Rosenborg was used as a royal residence only twice, and both these times were during emergencies. The first time was after Christiansborg Palace burned down in 1794, and the second time was during the British attack on Copenhagen in 1801.

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I then hiked the 1.8km to the National Museum of Denmark, stopping at a 7-11 on the way for a sandwich. ( 7-11's are all over the city!)
The museum covers 14,000 years of Danish history, from the reindeer-hunters of the Ice Age, Vikings, and works of religious art from the Middle Ages, when the church was highly significant in Danish life. Danish coins from Viking times to the present and coins from ancient Rome and Greece, as well as examples of the coinage and currencies of other cultures, are exhibited also. The National Museum keeps Denmark's largest and most varied collection of objects from the ancient cultures of Greece and Italy, the Near East and Egypt. Exhibits are also shown on who the Danish people are and were, stories of everyday life and special occasions, stories of the Danish state and nation, but most of all stories of different people's lives in Denmark from 1560 to 2000.
I spent my time at the Danish Pre-history and the Danish Middle Ages and Renaissance.

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From there I walked a few hundred meters to the Christiansborg Palace - the current palace of the Royal Family and the seat of Parliament.

The palace is thus home to the three supreme powers: the executive power, the legislative power, and the judicial power. It is the only building in the world that houses all three of a country's branches of government. The name Christiansborg is thus also frequently used as a metonym for the Danish political system, and colloquially it is often referred to as Rigsborgen ('the castle of the realm') or simply Borgen ('the castle'). The present building, the third with this name, is the last in a series of successive castles and palaces constructed on the same site since the erection of the first castle in 1167. Since the early fifteenth century, the various buildings have served as the base of the central administration; until 1794 as the principal residence of the Danish kings and after 1849 as the seat of parliament. The palace today bears witness to three eras of Danish architecture, as the result of two serious fires. The first fire occurred in 1794 and the second in 1884. The main part of the current palace, finished in 1928, is in the historicist Neo-baroque style. The chapel dates back to 1826 and is in a neoclassical style. The showgrounds were built from 1738 to 1746, in a baroque style. Visitors are able to visit the underground ruins, the Royal Representation Rooms, the Royal Kitchen and the Royal stables.

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Although a long walk, it was well worth it! The winter is great because nothing is crowded, unlike the summer when there are the usual land tourists plus up to three cruise ships.

Posted by rpickett 16:57 Archived in Denmark Tagged copenhagen

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